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Updated: October 2nd, 2013 11:45pm
Another day, another former Twins player has a big playoff performance

Another day, another former Twins player has a big playoff performance

by Derek Wetmore
1500ESPN.com
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Delmon Young batted seventh Wednesday night as the designated hitter for the Rays in the team's Wild Card playoff game against the Indians. That in itself is remarkable considering his career journey.

But having Young hit a homerun in his first at-bat Wednesday and then get intentionally walked as part of a 4-0 Rays win was an incredible stanza in the story of his career.

The Rays drafted Young first overall in 2003. They eventually traded him to the Twins, of course, where he played three and a half seasons before the Twins traded him to Detroit.

He became a bit of a playoff hero for the Tigers in 2012, when he set the club's postseason home run record (six). That wasn't enough to keep him in Detroit, though, as they let him walk and sign with the Phillies.

After a crummy season, the Phillies cut bait with Young in August, designating him for assignment, a new nadir in a career of ups and downs.

But he landed on his feet - probably gingerly - when he signed a minor league deal with the Rays and then made the playoff roster.

All that back story set the stage for his third-inning home run in the Rays one-game series playoff win over the Indians on Wednesday. He can be forgiven for the subsequent bat flip, too. Young finished 1-for-3 with the intentional walk and a strikeout.

The Twins, of course, shouldn't be chastised for parting ways with Young. He has been a terrible hitter in his career and was an ever worse defender, making him a nearly worthless player. Still, Young's career narrative is a pretty remarkable and maddening story.

He's 28 years old. That, too, is a bit remarkable.

Derek Wetmore is the senior editor for 1500ESPN.com. His previous stops include MLB.com and the Minnesota Daily.
Email Derek | @DerekWetmore
In this story: Delmon Young
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