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Updated: October 13th, 2012 5:52pm
Gophers coach Jerry Kill suffers seizure shortly after team's loss

Gophers coach Jerry Kill suffers seizure shortly after team's loss

by Nate Sandell
1500ESPN.com
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Minnesota Gophers football coach Jerry Kill suffered a seizure in the coaches' locker room following his team's 21-13 loss to Northwestern on Saturday at TCF Bank Stadium, a Gophers spokesperson confirmed.

The seizure occurred shortly after Kill had concluded his postgame news conference, and was immediately attended to by team medical personnel before being transported to a local hospital by ambulance as a precaution.

The team is reporting that Kill is alert and resting comfortably, but will remain in the hospital as he undergoes further testing. University officials do not anticipate further information on Coach Kill's condition being available Saturday night, but are hoping to provide an update on Sunday.

A source told 1500 ESPN that the incident is considered to be a minor lapse in his ongoing battle with seizures, and it is not expected to keep him away from the team for an extended period.

Kill has endured the effects of a seizure disorder for the majority of the last 20 years, and is on daily medication to combat the issue.

His most notable public episode came last season when he suffered a major seizure in the fourth quarter of the Gophers' home opener against New Mexico State. He was hospitalized for several days afterward as he went through several minor episodes, but Kill returned to the sidelines the following weekend.

Kill exhibited no obvious signs of an oncoming seizure when he addressed the media after the game Saturday. He was calm and answered questions in concise details. He had a water bottle in hand, which he was taking frequent sips from. Dehydration had been a large contributing factor to his incident against New Mexico State in 2011.

Nate Sandell is a contributor to 1500ESPN.com.
Email Nate | @nsandell
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