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Ranking remaining offensive linemen by ‘advanced’ statistics

Opinions are easier to find than lakes in Minnesota around draft time, but one thing everyone agrees on is that the Vikings need to select at least one offensive linemen in the NFL Draft.

How can we separate the best prospects? One way is through film analysis, but there are many different interpretations of players’ skill sets and potential ceilings. Pro Football Focus’s Draft Pass includes run and pass blocking statistics based on player tracking on tape. Which players come out as the best by the numbers? Let’s have a look:

Tackles

Taylor Moton, Western Michigan

Credit: Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

Moton is a massive linemen at 6-foot-5, 320-pounds whose sheer power gives him a chance to develop into a good tackle. 


Pass Block Efficiency: 98.6 (3rd) – 0 sacks, 2 QB hits, 6 hurries

Run Block Success: 91.8% (41st)

PFF overall grade: 83.5

Antonio Garcia, Troy

Garcia is tall at 6-foot-6 and has outstanding athleticism, but there are concerns over his technique and ability to stay over 300 pounds. 


Pass Block Efficiency: 98.9 (2nd) – 0 sacks, 1 QB hits, 5 hurries

Run Block Success: 94.1% (7th)

PFF overall grade: 79.1

Roderick Johnson, Florida State

Tall and powerful, Johnson had terrific run and blocking numbers, but his pass blocking technique is lacking, meaning he will need time to develop in the NFL. 


Pass Block Efficiency: 97.3 (21st) – 3 sacks, 4 QB hits, 9 hurries

Run Block Success: 93.4% (18th)

PFF overall grade: 78.7

Connor McDermott, UCLA

Not only is McDermott one of the tallest linemen in the draft at 6-foot-8, the former high school basketball player is a good athlete and can move quick enough to block edge rushers. He has problems with strength and struggles against powerful bull rushes. 


Pass Block Efficiency: 97.4 (18th) – 2 sacks, 7 QB hits, 9 hurries

Run Block Success: 89.4% (71st)

PFF overall grade: 78.3

Cam Robinson, Alabama

In many mocks, Robinson is a first-round pick because of his size, power and athleticism, but inconsistency and struggles with balance may cause him to drop in the draft.


Pass Block Efficiency: 97.8 (10th) – 1 sack, 2 QB hits, 11 hurries

Run Block Success: 88.3% (79th)

PFF overall grade: 74.3

Statistical sleeper: 

Zach Banner, USC

Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

Banner isn’t considered a first or second round pick, but he is gargantuan at 6-foot-8, 353-pounds and powerful. Some believe he will ultimately become a guard because he won’t be able to slow down edge rushers. His pass blocking numbers, while playing in the Pac-12, were very good by PFF standards.


Pass Block Efficiency: 97.9 (9th) – 2 sacks, 1 QB hit, 8 hurries

Run Block Success: 90.4% (57th)

PFF overall grade: 80.6

Guards/Centers

Forrest Lamp, Western Kentucky

The highest rated guard by Pro Football Focus metrics, Lamp is an outstanding athlete who many projected to be drafted in the middle of the first round.


Pass Block Efficiency: 99.1 (1st) – 0 sack, 3 QB hits, 2 hurries

Run Block Success: 95.0% (3rd)

PFF overall grade: 88.0

Ethan Pocic, LSU

Pocic his been lauded for his versatility and smarts. He’s played all five positions at times in college and made the calls on the offensive line. For a tall interior linemen, he does not have impressive power.


Pass Block Efficiency: 97.5 (34th) – 0 sack, 0 QB hits, 11 hurries

Run Block Success: 90.0% (21st)

PFF overall grade: 82.5

Dion Dawkins, Temple

A three-year starter at Temple, Dawkins is listed as a guard but might develop into a starting tackle. Power is his calling card.


Pass Block Efficiency: 98.4 (4th) – 2 sacks, 2 QB hits, 6 hurries

Run Block Success: 91.8% (41st)

PFF overall grade: 80.4

Pat Elflein, Ohio State

One of Ohio State’s leaders, Elflein is a determined run blocker whose strength has been talked about as a major plus. That could make him attractive for the Vikings. His numbers in pass protection, however, were more impressive. 


Pass Block Efficiency: 97.1 (41st) – 3 sacks, 2 QB hits, 11 hurries

Run Block Success: 90.2% (19th)

PFF overall grade: 80.1

Dan Feeney, Indiana

Credit: Indiana Athletics

Noted for his excellence as a zone blocker, Feeney has quick enough feet to get outside and effectively pull. He’s patient when looking for blocks in space and can hold his own against interior rushers. Being limited to a zone scheme might hurt his stock.


Pass Block Efficiency: 97.5 (41st) – 1 sack, 1QB hit, 8 hurries

Run Block Success: 88.0% (43rd)

PFF overall grade: 77.9

Dorian Johnson, Pitt

Credit: Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports

A former five-star prospect, Johnson has been called hard-nosed and smart and scored highly in several events at the combine, but he did not have impressive numbers in the run game.


Pass Block Efficiency: 98.5 (12th) – 1 sack, 0 QB hits, 6 hurries

Run Block Success: 93.2% (3rd)

PFF overall grade: 77.2

Isaac Asiata

The cousin of running back Matt Asiata, Isaac plays with a high-level of intensity, which sometimes can be good and other times can get him in trouble.


Pass Block Efficiency: 97.3 (44th) – 4 sacks, 2 QB hits, 9 hurries

Run Block Success: 88.2% (42nd)

PFF overall grade: 77.1

Statistical sleeper:

Chase Roullier, Wyoming

Roullier can play either guard or center and is a powerful blocker. There are some worries about his length not matching that of most NFL interior linemen.


Pass Block Efficiency: 98.7 (5th) – 0 sack, 1 QB hits, 7 hurries

Run Block Success: 91.6% (6th)

PFF overall grade: 81.8





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